Abandoned Mill-Milford, Nebraska Part I

Abandoned Mill

*** Note-I receive many emails, and other messages regarding directions to this location. Due to where the site is located, and how many people are interested, and the danger of the site, I have stopped giving out directions. Thanks, as always, for reading!***

I first visited this abandoned mill about 17 years ago, while visiting Nebraska with my boyfriend, who I ended up marrying, having two children with, and divorcing. Since writing this I did some additional research and found some history on the mill. In 1867, William Reed, J.L. Davison, and Mr. Messrs built a brush dam across the Blue River and commenced the erection of their grist-mill, and the spring they had also completed a saw-mill. I’m not sure which mill this is or where the other location might be, but if interested in more information, I would suggest speaking to locals or going to the library. I was unable to find the reason behind the mill closing down, but the town history is quite interesting! One of the articles I found eluded to the town being named Milford after the mill.

Abandoned Mill Stairs

I had not been back to the mill in years and I wondered if it was still even intact. Still standing, but kids and vandals have obviously done their damage over the years.

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This particular location has large loose concrete, a deep uncovered hole inside the building, several unstable surfaces where one could easily lose their footing, jagged sharp metal sticking out, and of course the river. The roof of the building is half gone and the rest of it could potentially fall in. This was one of the most dangerous abandoned places I have photographed.

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My husband and I attempted to visit the old mill once earlier this winter, but it was far too frigid and muddy to climb down to the ruins for the good shots. I was NOT happy.

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After returning the second time, I actually understood why my husband was hesitant for me to walk down to the bottom. I have a prosthetic hip and it is not always easy for me to climb, especially in 30 degree weather.

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In spite of the danger-factor, I still find the place quite beautiful. The contrast of the stone walls against the skeletal trees, and the neon words spray-painted on the rusted metal doors as one last declaration against nature.

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This place had an overwhelming energy surrounding it, which almost overpowered me. I actually almost fell over the side of one of the hills into the river at one point. This is why I state repeatedly it is not a good idea to explore these places alone! If I would have fallen who would have rescued me? Luckily I was there with my husband. I have an essential tremor that is pretty well-controlled with medication, but under stress it’s exacerbated. My entire body was trembling so badly I almost fell.

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The interior of this building was unsettling. As I walked out of it, there is a steep drop-down and one wrong step you could end up in the river. I was shaking so badly I had to grab onto the wall and go sit down to calm myself before I could continue. I did not return to the inside of the building.

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Inside the small building, in one of the corners, a deep hole partially covered by a tattered sheet of metal, just waiting for someone to fall into. It reminded me of the Buffalo Bill scene in the Silence of the Lambs. I don’t know what the hole was used for, but it gave me the creeps!

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On the other side of the building, concrete girders line up in standing guard over the old place. In order to get to the river you have to walk across one of the girders.

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Check back for part II! There were far too many pictures for one post.

 

“Ye who read are still among the living; but I who write shall have long since gone my way into the legion of shadows. For indeed strange things shall happen, and secret things be known, and many centuries shall pass away, ere these memorials be seen of men. And when seen, there will be some to disbelieve, and some to doubt, and yet a few who will find much to ponder upon in the characters here graven with stylus of iron.” -Edgar Allan Poe

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Trish Eklund is the owner and creator of Abandoned, Forgotten & Decayed. She is also the owner and founder of Family Fusion Community, an online community and resource for divorced and remarried parents, step-parents, same-sex parents, adopting parents, and all other non-traditional parents. Trish has been featured on www.playground-magazine.comwww.bigblendedfamily.com, and Her View From Home.  Follow her on Twitter: @trishiewriter, Google +, Pinterest, Instagram, and, LinkedIn.

Trish at Beetison2

8 thoughts on “Abandoned Mill-Milford, Nebraska Part I

  1. My brother & I would like to photograph This location as we wwil be in Lincoln,Nebraska in a few weeks.Could you please email me directions & does this mill have a name?

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    1. Sure! I’ll email you! I’m sure it had a name, but I couldn’t find it. Perhaps if you look in archives in a library or something? My ex said he thought it closed in the 1920’s or 1930’s but I can’t verify that. It’s extremely dangerous though.

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    2. Jessica, I emailed you directions. Also, I just added some history on the place to the post. Please let me know if you find out anything more and I will add it. There were actually two mills in Milford, so I’m wondering now where the second mill is/was and if it’s still running or also abandoned. I think I’m going to have to find out!

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